(Thumbnail Image: Naples News)

 

Some Florida teachers are outraged at Senate Bill 6: a piece of legislation that might affect their salaries.

Senate Bill 6 would focus on student test scores rather than tenure and higher level degrees to determine teachers' salaries. Teachers are calling on Republican Gov. Charlie Crist to veto the bill.

One PTA member tells Fox 30, if the bill passes, teacher compensation will be based on a single test on a single day.

"I have been in classrooms where kids just, you know, had a rough night the night before and they fill out the first two or three questions and then put their pencil down and they fall asleep and you know there's nothing a teacher can do about that."

Even though most states operate on a seniority system, half of all U.S. states have at least one school district using the merit system. Progressive Policy Institute President Will Marshall tells MSNBC the merit system is the way to go.

"In every other profession, people are graded on their performance. The chief business of teachers is to educate children and so how students perform and how much they learn should obviously be part of their evaluation and I think it makes sense also to be a part of their compensation."

Critics say -- while some studies have shown that merit pay systems allow teachers to keep their jobs longer -- no research shows whether the system benefits the students.

Florida News Capitol reports the governor received 47,000 e-mails and 14,000 phone calls asking him to get rid of the bill. One Republican senator says the bill needs to be reformed.

"If they had a chance to vote on it again they would vote against it. They realized that they rushed through a piece of public policy that although well intentioned wasn't well thought out."

The bill would require about $900 million statewide to pay for the program. Although Crist initially said he would sign the bill, supporters think he might veto it in an attempt to resurrect his struggling U.S. Senate campaign.

Amid Outcry, Fla. Considers Teacher Merit Pay

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Apr 14, 2010

Amid Outcry, Fla. Considers Teacher Merit Pay

(Thumbnail Image: Naples News)

 

Some Florida teachers are outraged at Senate Bill 6: a piece of legislation that might affect their salaries.

Senate Bill 6 would focus on student test scores rather than tenure and higher level degrees to determine teachers' salaries. Teachers are calling on Republican Gov. Charlie Crist to veto the bill.

One PTA member tells Fox 30, if the bill passes, teacher compensation will be based on a single test on a single day.

"I have been in classrooms where kids just, you know, had a rough night the night before and they fill out the first two or three questions and then put their pencil down and they fall asleep and you know there's nothing a teacher can do about that."

Even though most states operate on a seniority system, half of all U.S. states have at least one school district using the merit system. Progressive Policy Institute President Will Marshall tells MSNBC the merit system is the way to go.

"In every other profession, people are graded on their performance. The chief business of teachers is to educate children and so how students perform and how much they learn should obviously be part of their evaluation and I think it makes sense also to be a part of their compensation."

Critics say -- while some studies have shown that merit pay systems allow teachers to keep their jobs longer -- no research shows whether the system benefits the students.

Florida News Capitol reports the governor received 47,000 e-mails and 14,000 phone calls asking him to get rid of the bill. One Republican senator says the bill needs to be reformed.

"If they had a chance to vote on it again they would vote against it. They realized that they rushed through a piece of public policy that although well intentioned wasn't well thought out."

The bill would require about $900 million statewide to pay for the program. Although Crist initially said he would sign the bill, supporters think he might veto it in an attempt to resurrect his struggling U.S. Senate campaign.

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