BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

(Image source: National Geographic)

 

With the immediate threat of Superstorm Sandy over, the focus in New York City turns to how the thousands of residents still without power will deal with freezing overnight temperatures.

As many as 30-to-40 thousand people in New York will need new temporary or long-term housing following the storm. 

That’s according to New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, who in a joint press conference with New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, compared the devastation of Sandy to that of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, saying:

After Katrina, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, put up displaced residents in trailers, hotels, and even cruise ships across several states, but Bloomberg noted that unlike victims of Katrina most New York residents have chosen to stay put, rather than relocate.


FEMA is now reporting that about 86,000 New York-area households have registered for emergency assistance -- costing the agency about $97 million. Cleanup, FEMA estimates, will take more than a year.   

Cuomo told reporters that although progress has been made to get power back on for those in Manhattan, a lack of electricity remains a problems for thousands of residents in New York’s other boroughs.

 “If the power is on, the problem is solved, and if the power is not on, the problem is not solved. So I understand all of these numbers are nice, but they mean nothing until the power is on in your house.”
 
Officials have urged residents to go the newly-opened warming shelters, as temperatures are expected to dip into the thirties Sunday night -- but many are staying put. ABC7 New York explains:

Yesterday Mayor Bloomberg urged everyone to get a warm place to sleep, but in the Rockaways residents told us they’re worried about looters and  say they don’t want to leave what they have left.”

According to FEMA estimates, about 730,000 people in New York are still without electricity.

After Sandy, Freezing Temperatures Add to Housing Crisis

by Elizabeth Hagedorn
0
Transcript
Nov 4, 2012

After Sandy, Freezing Temperatures Add to Housing Crisis

 

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

(Image source: National Geographic)

 

With the immediate threat of Superstorm Sandy over, the focus in New York City turns to how the thousands of residents still without power will deal with freezing overnight temperatures.

As many as 30-to-40 thousand people in New York will need new temporary or long-term housing following the storm. 

That’s according to New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, who in a joint press conference with New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, compared the devastation of Sandy to that of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, saying:

After Katrina, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, put up displaced residents in trailers, hotels, and even cruise ships across several states, but Bloomberg noted that unlike victims of Katrina most New York residents have chosen to stay put, rather than relocate.


FEMA is now reporting that about 86,000 New York-area households have registered for emergency assistance -- costing the agency about $97 million. Cleanup, FEMA estimates, will take more than a year.   

Cuomo told reporters that although progress has been made to get power back on for those in Manhattan, a lack of electricity remains a problems for thousands of residents in New York’s other boroughs.

 “If the power is on, the problem is solved, and if the power is not on, the problem is not solved. So I understand all of these numbers are nice, but they mean nothing until the power is on in your house.”
 
Officials have urged residents to go the newly-opened warming shelters, as temperatures are expected to dip into the thirties Sunday night -- but many are staying put. ABC7 New York explains:

Yesterday Mayor Bloomberg urged everyone to get a warm place to sleep, but in the Rockaways residents told us they’re worried about looters and  say they don’t want to leave what they have left.”

According to FEMA estimates, about 730,000 people in New York are still without electricity.

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