(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY NIELS SCHACK NORGAARD

ANCHOR DAVID EARL



It’s a trial that’s been years in the making and surrounded by controversy.
Now, five al-Quada members charged with being behind the September 11th terrorist attacks, including Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, are set to go on trial before a Guantanamo Bay military tribunal.

”They’re charged with planning and executing the September 11 attacks in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Shanksville, PA, killing nearly 3,000 people. If convicted, they could be sentenced to death.”


On Wednesday, U.S. Department of Defense announced that the five are charged with...


”… terrorism, hijacking aircraft, conspiracy, murder in violation of the law of war, attacking civilians, attacking civilian objects, intentionally causing serious bodily injury and destruction of property in violation of the law of war.”
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was initially charged by the U.S. military in 2008. The case was stopped from moving forward by President Obama in 2009. All part of his effort to close the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay.

”They were originally going to be tried in a civilian court in Manhattan, but after wide public backlash the Congress opposed the move and the Obama administration was forced to shift it back to Guantanamo.”

The decision to send the case back to military court has immediately sparked criticism from the ACLU. Executive director Anthony Romero released a statement saying the Obama administration is making a terrible mistake.

”Whatever verdict comes out of the Guantánamo military commissions will be tainted by an unfair process and the politics that wrongly pulled these cases from federal courts, which have safely and successfully handled hundreds of terrorism trials. The military commissions were set up to achieve easy convictions and hide the reality of torture, not to provide a fair trial.”


Military officials, however, refute the ACLU claims. As The Washington Post reports, chief military prosecutor General Mark Martins says a military trial is no backdoor for tainted evidence.


“If observers withhold judgement for a time, the system they see will prove itself deserving of public confidence.”

The defendants have to be arraigned within 30 days.  No date for the trial has been set.

Accused 9/11 Plotters Could Face Death Penalty

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Apr 5, 2012

Accused 9/11 Plotters Could Face Death Penalty

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY NIELS SCHACK NORGAARD

ANCHOR DAVID EARL



It’s a trial that’s been years in the making and surrounded by controversy.
Now, five al-Quada members charged with being behind the September 11th terrorist attacks, including Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, are set to go on trial before a Guantanamo Bay military tribunal.

”They’re charged with planning and executing the September 11 attacks in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Shanksville, PA, killing nearly 3,000 people. If convicted, they could be sentenced to death.”


On Wednesday, U.S. Department of Defense announced that the five are charged with...


”… terrorism, hijacking aircraft, conspiracy, murder in violation of the law of war, attacking civilians, attacking civilian objects, intentionally causing serious bodily injury and destruction of property in violation of the law of war.”
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was initially charged by the U.S. military in 2008. The case was stopped from moving forward by President Obama in 2009. All part of his effort to close the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay.

”They were originally going to be tried in a civilian court in Manhattan, but after wide public backlash the Congress opposed the move and the Obama administration was forced to shift it back to Guantanamo.”

The decision to send the case back to military court has immediately sparked criticism from the ACLU. Executive director Anthony Romero released a statement saying the Obama administration is making a terrible mistake.

”Whatever verdict comes out of the Guantánamo military commissions will be tainted by an unfair process and the politics that wrongly pulled these cases from federal courts, which have safely and successfully handled hundreds of terrorism trials. The military commissions were set up to achieve easy convictions and hide the reality of torture, not to provide a fair trial.”


Military officials, however, refute the ACLU claims. As The Washington Post reports, chief military prosecutor General Mark Martins says a military trial is no backdoor for tainted evidence.


“If observers withhold judgement for a time, the system they see will prove itself deserving of public confidence.”

The defendants have to be arraigned within 30 days.  No date for the trial has been set.

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