(Thumbnail Image: Gizmodo)

 

A software engineer walks into a bar.... 

 

What may sound like the start to a bad joke has now escalated into a full criminal investigation after police raided the home of Jason Chen, editor of tech blog Gizmodo.com.


Officers raided Chen's home days after Gizmodo leaked information of Apple's highly anticipated 4G iPhone. Officers say they have reason to believe the phone was obtained illegally and have launched the investigation as a result.

 

Gizmodo released a statement along with documents regarding the incident on their website. Gawker Media, Gizmodo's parent company is now demanding officials return Chen's possessions on grounds that his rights as a journalist were violated. 

 

This raises the question are bloggers considered journalists? A reporter for San Francisco's KPIX takes a look into the growing debate.

 

KIET DO: "Attorney David Greene with the First Amendment Project says bloggers who publish periodically can be considered journalists and are protected from search warrants by California's shield law."

 

DAVID GREENE: "If the police are now on notice that the search they executed was not legal then it would behoove them to not look further into what they're doing, because they really run the risk, if the search warrant turns out to be illegal of tainting all the evidence they would collect thereafter." 


Apple has yet to comment on the incident at Chen's home. Following the leak, Apple sent Gizmodo a letter demanding the return of its prototype phone. 

 

The editor of website Techmeme.com told NBC that this might be the wrath of Steve Jobs at work.


"Apple, Steve Jobs, probably fuming that this happened. You can't imagine a CEO that is more upset the day he sees this coming out on a blog. You know, and there's his baby just sitting there for all the world to see before he gets to announce it...The website claims it gave the forbidden phone back to Apple, but the video is still up for everyone to see."


One Yahoo! News writer speculates that Apple and CEO Steve Jobs are the ones pulling the strings behind the scene.

 

"The raid that San Mateo area cops conducted last week on the house of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen came at the behest of a special multi-agency task force that was commissioned to work with the computer industry to tackle high-tech crimes. And Apple Inc. sits on the task force's steering committee."

        

So what do you think? Are Chen and Gizmodo in the right? Or is this the risk of messing with the forbidden fruit?

 

Writer: Maurice Scarborough

Producer: Erik Shute

4G iPhone Tech Reporter's Home Raided

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Sources:KPIXNBCYahoo
Transcript
Apr 28, 2010

4G iPhone Tech Reporter's Home Raided

(Thumbnail Image: Gizmodo)

 

A software engineer walks into a bar.... 

 

What may sound like the start to a bad joke has now escalated into a full criminal investigation after police raided the home of Jason Chen, editor of tech blog Gizmodo.com.


Officers raided Chen's home days after Gizmodo leaked information of Apple's highly anticipated 4G iPhone. Officers say they have reason to believe the phone was obtained illegally and have launched the investigation as a result.

 

Gizmodo released a statement along with documents regarding the incident on their website. Gawker Media, Gizmodo's parent company is now demanding officials return Chen's possessions on grounds that his rights as a journalist were violated. 

 

This raises the question are bloggers considered journalists? A reporter for San Francisco's KPIX takes a look into the growing debate.

 

KIET DO: "Attorney David Greene with the First Amendment Project says bloggers who publish periodically can be considered journalists and are protected from search warrants by California's shield law."

 

DAVID GREENE: "If the police are now on notice that the search they executed was not legal then it would behoove them to not look further into what they're doing, because they really run the risk, if the search warrant turns out to be illegal of tainting all the evidence they would collect thereafter." 


Apple has yet to comment on the incident at Chen's home. Following the leak, Apple sent Gizmodo a letter demanding the return of its prototype phone. 

 

The editor of website Techmeme.com told NBC that this might be the wrath of Steve Jobs at work.


"Apple, Steve Jobs, probably fuming that this happened. You can't imagine a CEO that is more upset the day he sees this coming out on a blog. You know, and there's his baby just sitting there for all the world to see before he gets to announce it...The website claims it gave the forbidden phone back to Apple, but the video is still up for everyone to see."


One Yahoo! News writer speculates that Apple and CEO Steve Jobs are the ones pulling the strings behind the scene.

 

"The raid that San Mateo area cops conducted last week on the house of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen came at the behest of a special multi-agency task force that was commissioned to work with the computer industry to tackle high-tech crimes. And Apple Inc. sits on the task force's steering committee."

        

So what do you think? Are Chen and Gizmodo in the right? Or is this the risk of messing with the forbidden fruit?

 

Writer: Maurice Scarborough

Producer: Erik Shute

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