That was part of the trailer for the new movie "2012" starring John Cusack. Cusack plays a researcher working to fight the apocalypse the Mayans predicted will happen on Dec. 21, 2012.

 

The media are sharing different viewpoints on the controversial movie, the hype, and fear it has caused. We are looking at perspectives from BBC News, Wired, CNN, National Geographic, and The Washington Post.

CNN’s Jeanne Moos spoke to NASA scientist David Morrison about the hype surrounding the film and NASA’s response.

“The doomsday movie "2012" is coming out but don’t stop paying your mortgage because NASA assures us that nothing bad will happen. ‘There is no threat to earth in 2012.’ Seriously folks, there’s been so much chatter about this...that NASA is reassuring people on its Web site. ‘All the talk about a doomsday is a big hoax.’”

Sony Pictures Entertainment, the film distributor, has launched a number of marketing Web sites for "2012." 

According to a National Geographic article, these realistic sites may have prompted some of the scared consumers to contact NASA.

Sony Pictures spokesperson Steve Elzer tells National Geographic that "2012’s" marketing materials are meant to promote the movie – not an apocalypse mindset.

“When moviegoers see trailers or visit Web sites linked to our film…they know this is an entertainment experience, just as those who see materials created for Transformers understand robot aliens have not really landed or those who attend Twilight: New Moon know vampires are not actually among us.”

BBC News spoke with "2012’s" director, Roland Emmerich, who defended his controversial film and spoke about its label as ‘disaster porn’.

“What do you make of that labeling? ‘I don’t like the word very much. The first 45 minutes, there is not one very big disaster scene – it’s all about character development. Because we set up all the characters so well we only have to have one little scene in between there to play it off.’”

The Washington Post writer Joel Achenbach takes an opposite viewpoint. He says misinformation is a big part of the "2012" movie controversy and doomsday myth.

“The world…is not coming to an end on Dec. 21, 2012, contrary to the viral Internet rumor propounded by pseudo-scientists, hoaxers, Hollywood movie promoters and assorted void-between-the-ears people who wouldn't recognize a scientific fact if it tried to abduct them.”

What do you think? What’s the best way to deal with consumer fears and "2012" movie hype?

‘2012’ Disaster Film Sparks Doomsday Fears

by Nathan Giannini
0
Transcript
Nov 15, 2009

‘2012’ Disaster Film Sparks Doomsday Fears

That was part of the trailer for the new movie "2012" starring John Cusack. Cusack plays a researcher working to fight the apocalypse the Mayans predicted will happen on Dec. 21, 2012.

 

The media are sharing different viewpoints on the controversial movie, the hype, and fear it has caused. We are looking at perspectives from BBC News, Wired, CNN, National Geographic, and The Washington Post.

CNN’s Jeanne Moos spoke to NASA scientist David Morrison about the hype surrounding the film and NASA’s response.

“The doomsday movie "2012" is coming out but don’t stop paying your mortgage because NASA assures us that nothing bad will happen. ‘There is no threat to earth in 2012.’ Seriously folks, there’s been so much chatter about this...that NASA is reassuring people on its Web site. ‘All the talk about a doomsday is a big hoax.’”

Sony Pictures Entertainment, the film distributor, has launched a number of marketing Web sites for "2012." 

According to a National Geographic article, these realistic sites may have prompted some of the scared consumers to contact NASA.

Sony Pictures spokesperson Steve Elzer tells National Geographic that "2012’s" marketing materials are meant to promote the movie – not an apocalypse mindset.

“When moviegoers see trailers or visit Web sites linked to our film…they know this is an entertainment experience, just as those who see materials created for Transformers understand robot aliens have not really landed or those who attend Twilight: New Moon know vampires are not actually among us.”

BBC News spoke with "2012’s" director, Roland Emmerich, who defended his controversial film and spoke about its label as ‘disaster porn’.

“What do you make of that labeling? ‘I don’t like the word very much. The first 45 minutes, there is not one very big disaster scene – it’s all about character development. Because we set up all the characters so well we only have to have one little scene in between there to play it off.’”

The Washington Post writer Joel Achenbach takes an opposite viewpoint. He says misinformation is a big part of the "2012" movie controversy and doomsday myth.

“The world…is not coming to an end on Dec. 21, 2012, contrary to the viral Internet rumor propounded by pseudo-scientists, hoaxers, Hollywood movie promoters and assorted void-between-the-ears people who wouldn't recognize a scientific fact if it tried to abduct them.”

What do you think? What’s the best way to deal with consumer fears and "2012" movie hype?

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