(Image Source: Climate Central  )

BY MADISON MACK

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


It isn’t just your imagination, this winter has been extremely mild. In fact, one of the mildest on record.

“Last year was the hottest year on record for the continental U.S. and boy did it take its toll.
“11 weather disaster carried more than a billion dollar price tag including a lingering drought.”

“This big group of information here all stuck together in the middle of the chart is the 20th century, the last 100 years or so. But look at this one rogue spot on top. That was 2012. Well above the average.”


A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's “State of the Climate” report released Tuesday found the average temperature for the entire 2012 was 55.3 degrees Fahrenheit, a good 3.2 degrees warmer than the average for the entire 20th century.   

Overall 19 states experienced a record warm year and 26 other states reported one of their 10 warmest. The report also says 2012 experienced the second-most extreme weather events ever.

This maps details every climate record that was set across the United States. As you can see there are quite a few.

A NOAA scientist who worked on the report says there are more warmer than average years to come, which could lead to more frequent extreme weather events.

“We expect to see a continued trend of big heat events, we expect to see big rain events and with slightly less confidence, we expect to see continued trend in drought … This is consistent with what we would expect in a warming world.”

The report has green groups and several politicians calling on the president and Congress to take political action by capping U.S. greenhouse gas emissions or imposing a carbon tax. But such proposals would face an uncertain future in Congress.

The Director of the Natural Resources Defense Council's Climate and Clean Air Program told Politico.

“Congress can no longer afford to watch the devastation from an air conditioned perch,” … We must make 2013 a year for climate action. Waiting around for the next superstorm to flood Boston’s Faneuil Hall or the Boston Garden is not an option.”

And a Texas A&M climate scientist told The Hill there will be more extreme weather years to come.

"Not every year will be hot, but when heat waves do occur, the heat will be more extreme. People need to begin to prepare for that future."

2012 Was The Hottest Year on Record

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Jan 8, 2013

2012 Was The Hottest Year on Record

(Image Source: Climate Central  )

BY MADISON MACK

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


It isn’t just your imagination, this winter has been extremely mild. In fact, one of the mildest on record.

“Last year was the hottest year on record for the continental U.S. and boy did it take its toll.
“11 weather disaster carried more than a billion dollar price tag including a lingering drought.”

“This big group of information here all stuck together in the middle of the chart is the 20th century, the last 100 years or so. But look at this one rogue spot on top. That was 2012. Well above the average.”


A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's “State of the Climate” report released Tuesday found the average temperature for the entire 2012 was 55.3 degrees Fahrenheit, a good 3.2 degrees warmer than the average for the entire 20th century.   

Overall 19 states experienced a record warm year and 26 other states reported one of their 10 warmest. The report also says 2012 experienced the second-most extreme weather events ever.

This maps details every climate record that was set across the United States. As you can see there are quite a few.

A NOAA scientist who worked on the report says there are more warmer than average years to come, which could lead to more frequent extreme weather events.

“We expect to see a continued trend of big heat events, we expect to see big rain events and with slightly less confidence, we expect to see continued trend in drought … This is consistent with what we would expect in a warming world.”

The report has green groups and several politicians calling on the president and Congress to take political action by capping U.S. greenhouse gas emissions or imposing a carbon tax. But such proposals would face an uncertain future in Congress.

The Director of the Natural Resources Defense Council's Climate and Clean Air Program told Politico.

“Congress can no longer afford to watch the devastation from an air conditioned perch,” … We must make 2013 a year for climate action. Waiting around for the next superstorm to flood Boston’s Faneuil Hall or the Boston Garden is not an option.”

And a Texas A&M climate scientist told The Hill there will be more extreme weather years to come.

"Not every year will be hot, but when heat waves do occur, the heat will be more extreme. People need to begin to prepare for that future."

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