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The Trump Administration Now Wants SCOTUS To Reinstate The Travel Ban

Four of the nine Supreme Court justices must agree to hear the case.
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The Trump Administration Now Wants SCOTUS To Reinstate The Travel Ban

The Trump administration really wants its travel ban reinstated, and it could happen.

President Donald Trump and the Justice Department submitted a petition to the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday.

They asked the court to review lower courts' rulings that blocked a temporary ban keeping people from six Muslim-majority countries from traveling to the U.S.

The petition argues that as president, Trump has broad authority to restrict foreign nationals from entering the country if it's in the national interest. It also says the countries included in the ban present heightened terror risks.

But the order was blocked shortly after going into effect. And the U.S. hasn't experienced any recent attacks by a foreign-born terrorist. That could hamper the administration's argument that the ban is needed for national security. 

The administration's request comes roughly a week after the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the travel ban should be kept on hold.

Four of the nine justices on the Supreme Court have to agree to hear the case for it to go anywhere.

The court's term typically ends in June or early July and doesn't start up again until October. The Trump administration wants its ban to start during the recess until the court can hear the case.

Five of the nine justices have to vote "yes" for that to happen.

The court has asked that all responses to the petition are submitted by June 12.

And while justices usually stay out of politics, at least one — Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — has commented on both Trump's candidacy and his travel ban. She wasn't a fan of either one.

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the Supreme Court would review the injunctions against the executive order by June 12.